State University of New York at Oswego

About

Mission Statement

SUNY Oswego’s Active Aging and Community Engagement (AACE) Center in the Downtown Syracuse Metro Center is a multi-disciplinary applied research and outreach center, committed to promoting active aging in the Syracuse area through events and partnerships with local organizations, providing opportunities for SUNY Oswego students and faculty to engage with the Syracuse community.

Active Aging & Community Engagement Center Staff

Name: Kimberly A. Armani, Ph.D.

Title: Executive Director, AACE Center; Health-Related Programs Coordinator

Education: B.A. & B.S.N., University of Pennsylvania; MSN, MBA, Ph.D., Syracuse University

Special interests (teaching, research): Interdisciplinary teamwork, creativity and problem solving; marketing and management of health care services and organizations; new program development.

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: Life expectancy is greater today than at any time before.  This trend provides both significant challenges and exciting opportunities for business, non-profit, government and community organizations.  Thus, helping people age well is win-win for everyone in our community.

I am part of the AACE Center because: Addressing complex issues such as “aging well” cannot occur in within silos – rather these issues require community-wide plans and solutions.  The AACE Center provides a mechanism for engaging all stakeholders to increase our understanding of how people can age more actively and to facilitate the development of goods, services and supports necessary to achieve this goal.

 

Name:  Danielle Masursky, Ph.D.

Title:  Associate Director, AACE

Education:  BA, Northern Arizona Univ, 1983; MS, Rutgers Univ, 1989; PhD, Temple Univ, 2000

Special interests (teaching, research):  Mental health aspects of aging

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: we all want to live long, healthy, independent lives – “active aging” means examining the economic, social, physical, personal, behavioral, and health factors of our lives, and how they change as we move into the “third stage” of life.

I think people would be surprised to know: some of the commonly held stereotypes about aging/older people are completely wrong – as we age, we don’t necessarily become senile, sexless, unproductive, uncreative, or less willing to learn new things. Check out myths and stereotypes of aging here.

I am part of the AACE Center because: we focus on using unique approaches to solving problems related to aging – by collaborating with other organizations, we have the opportunity to examine aging issues and potential solutions from many different angles, which will create greater and more lasting impacts on our community.

Active Aging & Community Engagement Center Steering Committee

Name: Isabelle Bichindaritz

Title: Assistant Professor

Education: Ph.D. in Computer Science

Special interests (teaching, research): computational intelligence, machine learning, data mining, text mining, biomedical informatics, bioinformatics, public health informatics

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: I believe that informatics and technology can help seniors and care givers live healthier and happier lives.

I think people would be surprised to know: that the human body regenerates itself constantly so that we are all much younger than we think _ about aging/older people.

I am part of the AACE Center because: I want my research to help seniors and care givers live healthier and happier lives.

The most exciting advancement in Aging is/has been: technology helps the aged stay home.

Favorite aging-related link/resource:  MIT Agelab

 

Name: Laura Hess Brown, Ph.D.

Title: Professor of Human Development

Education: B.A. Honors Psychology SUNY Oswego, M.S. Human Development and Family Studies Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D. Child and Family Studies Syracuse University

Special interests (teaching, research): Intergenerational relationships, service-learning pedagogy, adoption as a family form

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: with changing demographics, it is vitally important to know what older adults are doing, what they need from society, and how to reverse the negative stereotypes which are now so prevalent.  It is also crucial to include older adults themselves in the research protocol, and have their viewpoints inform us as to what questions we should be asking next.

I think people would be surprised to know that less than 5% of adults over age 65 reside in nursing homes in the U.S.

I am part of the AACE Center because: It will incorporate an applied focus to gather researchers, educators, policy-makers, elders and practitioners to study aging and the needs of older adults in this area.

Favorite aging-related link/resource: How to Live to 101 (BBC, 2007)

 

Name: McLain, David

Title: Asst Professor, Management

Education: Ph.D. Management, M.S. Technology Policy, M.S. Preventive Medicine, B.S. Engineering Operations

Special interests (teaching, research): Decision making, safety, project management, technology entrepreneurship, workplace health and job performance.

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: everyone ages but the benefits of learning and experience that come with age are greatly underutilized.

I think people would be surprised to know: the varied interests, activities, and accumulated, interesting experiences about aging/older people.

I am part of the AACE Center because: I have a long-time interest in health and its relationship to work.

The most exciting advancement in Aging is/has been: advances in medical treatments

 

Name: Minjung Seo, Ph.D, CHES, FACSM

Title: Assistant Professor in Health Promotion and Wellness

Education: Dual Title Ph.D in Health Promotion and Gerontology from Purdue University, Indiana

M.A. in Gerontology from San Francisco State University, California

M.S. in Exercise Science from Sungkyunkwan University in Korea

Special interests (teaching, research): Dr. Seo’s teaching interests include health promotion program planning and exercise prescription. Her research interest focuses on exercise behavior correlated to personality traits, perceived mental and physical health, self-determination and self efficacy among older adults, senior exercise program implementation and evaluation, and attitude toward aging and death.

Favorite aging-related link/resource:

 

Name: Rebecca Mushtare

Title: Assistant Professor of Art

Education: MFA in Computer Art, Syracuse University; BFA in Graphic Design, SUNY Oswego

Special interests (teaching, research): community based learning, design for social change/impact, web design, gender and technology, experience design

Active Aging is interesting/important to study/understand because: it is an attempt to invest in our communities and our future.

I am part of the AACE Center because: Older adults use digital technology – it is a growing segment of smart phone and tablet users. My goal is to increase local resources, knowledge and expertise in designing/creating with and for this population.

Favorite aging-related link/resource: “Typography & the Aging Eye”